Glossary

Glossary

biometric archive

(biometric) archive: usually a state archive, containing biological data such as fingerprints, facial photographs, pupil scans, etc., of each citizen. Numerous security breaches pertaining to these archives and sales of biological data on the black market have been reported. An archive is both a place for saving and categorizing crucial data in a particular order as well as an active mechanism for economic investment and exercising political control.

body

each heteronym will function through the activity of its body. Each coroporeal entity will consist of DNA data, computer code and legal procedures.

cybergrogery

(noun.)

cy·ber·grogery

1. the art or practice of promoting and exploiting the Internet and its sharing, typically via apps or using microblogging software

"you can use any online application to join the cybergrogery Facebook group to begin shopping and organizing your collection"

2. a word that does not exist; it was invented, defined and used by a machine learning algorithm.

cyberslash

(noun.)

cy·ber·slash

1. a violent current of something, or of a volatile or unpleasant substance

"the cyberslash of the rising sea of opposition to the new economic policy"

2. a word that does not exist; it was invented, defined and used by a machine learning algorithm.

drone

unmanned aerial vehicle, usually used in military operations and missile attacks. The same principle is used in the skincare industry with cosmetic drones which enable a targeted delivery system of the product’s active ingredients (peptides, vitamins, etc.) into a specific receptor cell of the user’s skin. A face is thus a territory for beautifying products and cosmetics, intertwined with military rhetoric and protocol.

faciality

The concept of faciality, theorised in detail in A Thousand Plateaus and applied to cinema in the chapters of Cinema 1: The movement-image devoted to the close-up, stands at a crossroads of subjectivation and signifiance. The former belongs to the language of psychogenesis (how a living being grows into and negotiates the ambient world) and the latter to semiotics (denoting, contrary to polysemy, signs that disseminate infinite meaning in both conscious and unconscious registers and in directions not under the control of language rules). Subjectivation and signifiance are correlated, respectively, with the 'black hole' or unknown area of the face in which the subject invests his or her affective energies (that can range from fear to passion) and with the 'white wall', a surface on which signs are projected and from which they rebound or are reflected. Faciality is thus constituted by a system of surfaces and holes. The face 'is a surface: traits, lines, wrinkles; a long, square, triangular face; the face is a map' (D 1987: 170). A series of layers or strata, the face becomes a landscape when it is abstracted from the world at large and understood as a deterritorialised space or topography. It is a displacement of what a perceiver makes of the milieu and the faces that he or she discerns.

Deleuze relates faciality to the close-up in film, the cinematic technique that generally uses a lens of long focal length to bring the face forward and soften the edges of the frame, or else, to the contrary, deploys a lens of shorter length to obtain a facial projection or distortion at the centre of the image while the surrounding milieu is seen in sharp focus. In either mode the rotundity of a person's cheeks can resemble hillocks or mesas; the eyes might be reflective pools and ponds; the nostrils lairs and caves, and ears at once quarries and cirques.

In sum, a forceful reconsideration is made of the face work in philosophy, aesthetics and political theory. (The Deleuze Dictionary)

heteronym

a literary concept that refers to one or more imaginary character(s) created by a writer to write in different styles. Heteronyms differ from pen names (or pseudonyms, from the Greek words for "false" and "name") in that the latter are merely false names, while the former are characters that have their own supposed physiques, biographies, and writing styles. Heteronyms were named and developed by the Portuguese writer and poet Fernando Pessoa in the early 20th century, but were explored in greater detail by the Danish philosopher Kierkegaard. A Face or a Factory explores the boundaries and possibilities of heteronyms in the age of information and digital identities.

metagamy

(noun.)

1. the pattern of relationships between material things

"chronic metagamy is an age old idea"

2. a word that does not exist; it was invented, defined and used by a machine learning algorithm.

nontaxial

(adjective.)

non·tax·ial

1. closely interwoven with another

"a nontaxial relationship"

2. a word that does not exist; it was invented, defined and used by a machine learning algorithm.

prosopopeia

a rhetorical device in which a speaker or writer communicates to the audience by speaking as another person or object. The term literally derives from the Greek roots prósopon "face, person", and poiéin "to make, to do". To lend a voice therefore also means to lend a face, a mask.

prima pareculum

(adjective.)

pri·ma ·parecu·lum

1. denoting new forms of life in an unfamiliar place

"the first prima pareculum story"

2. a word that does not exist; it was invented, defined and used by a machine learning algorithm.

recuperare

(verb.)

re·cu·per·are

1. dress or prepare (another person, group, etc.) for performing a job or ceremony

"they recuperare Ed's wife"

2. a word that does not exist; it was invented, defined and used by a machine learning algorithm.

resynthetic

(adjective.)

resyn·thetic

1. relating to or denoting a method of synthetic synthesis applied to DNA

"transgenic (polyvinyl chloride) resynthetic membranes"

2. a word that does not exist; it was invented, defined and used by a machine learning algorithm.

retrograce

(verb [with object])

ret·ro·grace

1. make (the face of someone or something) appear smooth again

"for a long time we sought to retrograce the face of every older lady"

2. a word that does not exist; it was invented, defined and used by a machine learning algorithm.

stereocyte

(noun.)

stere·o·cyte

1. a pigment produced by a pigment cell that forms sebum

"luster-colored, sticky, stereocytes"

2. a word that does not exist; it was invented, defined and used by a machine learning algorithm.

soverraded

(adjective.)

sover·raded

1. feeling or characterized by keen awareness of political, social, or economic matters

"she did not win a sop against soverraded opponents"

2. a word that does not exist; it was invented, defined and used by a machine learning algorithm.

sapitalist

(adjective.)

sap·i·tal·ist

1. subject to pressure or pressure; excessively pro-oppressive

"he does advocacy work that is not sapitalist"

2. a word that does not exist; it was invented, defined and used by a machine learning algorithm.